Jennifer Rosner
Short Works


Motherlode: Teaching a Deaf Child Her Mother's Tongue

New York Times

When her daughters were born deaf, a hearing mother faced a choice between spoken language and sign.


Guest Blog

CarolineLeavittville, novelist, screenwriter, writing mentor, namer, book critic, knitting addict and chocoholic

From Caroline Leavitt: Jennifer Rosner wrote an extraordinary memoir about being the mother of two deaf children, but it's really more than that. It's truly a novel about what it means to be heard, how deafness is passed on through history and the controversy around sign language and cochlear implants. I was so knocked out by Rosner's book that I asked her if she'd write a guest blog, and she agreed. Many thanks, Jennifer.


String Theory:
Learning To Listen To My Deaf Daughters

The Jewish Daily Forward

This past Yom Kippur, my daughters and I wrote lists; each of us detailed the ways in which we hoped to improve ourselves in the coming year.


The Sound of Sound

Wondertime Magazine

For my 4-year-old daughter, Juliet, hearing is optional.


How Does Hearing Loss Affect Self-Esteem?
Ask Sophia

The Faster Times

Like many parents of special needs children, I often worry about my child’s self-esteem more than anything else.


Lullabies for Sophia

Hastings Center Report

Sophia was born perfect. I had six hours of untempered joy before the routine ALGO test, now widely used to screen newborns for hearing impairment, hinted at a serious problem.


The Messy Self: An Introduction

Originally published as the introduction to The Messy Self (Paradigm Publishers, 2007), edited by Jennifer Rosner. FMI.

There is nothing simple about being a self.




©2016 Jennifer Rosner. All rights reserved.